Big Chief Donald Harrison’s Congo Square Nation; Monday, August 18, 2014

Big Chief Donald Harrison’s Congo Square Nation Monday, August 18, 2014 Kuumbwa Jazz Center “Both old school and cutting-edge.” —Wall Street Journal New Orleans alto sax great Donald Harrison is “The King of Nouveau Swing,” a style that merges R&B, hip-hop, soul, rock and jazz with Afro-New Orleans traditional music. Harrison is notably the Big Chief of Congo Square Nation, a group that preserves the legacy of black New Orleans residents parading in beautiful, intricate Native American-influenced costumes. Harrison brings the rituals of Indian “masking’ to the jazz stage, alongside Zaccai Curtis on piano; Max Moran on bass; and Joe Dyson on drums. Harrison’s new album, This is Jazz, has garnered some of the finest reviews of his career. The New Orleans Black Mardi Gras Indians tradition dates back over 150 years, when black citizens of New Orleans donned ornate, Native American-themed costumes and paraded throughout the streets; the Indian imagery rooted in solidarity with the struggles of Native American tribes. There are numerous Mardi Gras Indian tribes in New Orleans, accompanied with a whole lexicon of song attributed to this culture (made famous by the eponymous album of The Wild Tchoupitoulas tribe). Born in the Crescent City in 1960, Harrison’s father was a “Big Chief” who raised his son steeped in the traditions of the Mardi Gras Indians and New Orleans music. Ultimately attending the Berklee School of Music, Harrison became an acclaimed jazz talent, performing with Roy Haynes, Terence Blanchard and Art Blakey. A Big Chief himself, of the Congo Square Nation tribe, Harrison recorded the notable album Indian Blues in 1991, which captured the sounds of...
Just Added: 10pm Snarky Puppy

Just Added: 10pm Snarky Puppy

Due to popular demand we have added a 2nd concert at 10pm to see Snarky Puppy on Friday, August 8. Snarky Puppy is truly a different kind of musical animal. A collective of musicians from Dallas and New York City the group play an infectious mixture of jazz, funk, and world music. Their unique musical style instantly draws listeners to the music with raw funk and sensitive dynamics, relentless pocket and lyrical melodicism, lush harmony and soulful simplicity, and most importantly, a delicate mixture of composition and improvisation. Don’t miss their Santa Cruz debut...

Crash Course

June 24, 2014   | Brian Palmer | Good Times New Carolina Chocolate Drops lineup gets a baptism by fire Change is inevitable, especially in bands. Members come and go—it simply comes with the territory. Hubby Jenkins—who plays the guitar, mandolin, banjo and bones for the Carolina Chocolate Drops—knows this all too well, as he joined the band just before they started recording their fourth album, 2012’s Leaving Eden. “Leaving Eden was an interesting album because [fiddler] Justin [Robinson] had just left the group, and they had already decided to record with Buddy Miller, and had even picked the recording dates,” Jenkins says. “It was an interesting time to be coming in, because they were ready to do different things with the new members. So it was a trial-by-fire period.” Jenkins is not exaggerating when he says there was a steep learning curve. He suspected he needed to get familiar with the band’s most recent work, but soon discovered that was just the beginning. “When I joined, we had about a month where we didn’t see each other, so I emailed them and asked, ‘What should I be working on? Stuff from the last album?’” he recalls. “They were like, ‘We’ll send you some stuff,’ and what they sent me was their entire repertoire! So I worked on a lot of stuff and tried to memorize as many songs as possible.” And it only got crazier from there. “On my first official day, within the first hour, we went to do a radio show, and then the next day we went to a gig, and a month later we were...
Chick Corea & The Vigil

Chick Corea & The Vigil

On Sale Now Monday, August 11, 7:30 PM at the Rio Theatre Sponsored by Law Offices of Atack & Penrose, LLP “Gale force intensity… gloriously impassioned.” – Jazzwise Magazine No one can accuse Chick Corea of resting on his laurels. The 20-time Grammy award-winner and NEA Jazz Master personifies a rare artistic standard of excellence. Corea’s latest project, The Vigil features all new compositions and re-workings of old favorites. The band includes Tim Garland on saxophones, flute, bass clarinet; Charles Altura on guitar; Carlitos Del Puerto on bass; Marcus Gilmore on drums; and Luisito Quintero on percussion. From his early work with Mongo Santamaria, Stan Getz and Miles Davis, and his avant-garde adventures in Circle (with Anthony Braxton), to pioneering fusion with Return To Forever, Corea tackles it all with a contagious...
Angélique Kidjo – June 19th

Angélique Kidjo – June 19th

Get your tickets now for the return of African diva Angélique Kidjo June 19 at the Rio Theatre. Born in Benin, West Africa, Angelique Kidjo is a Grammy award-winning singer deemed “Africa’s premier diva” by Time Magazine. Kidjo’s internationally acclaimed repertoire includes collaborations with various recording artists such as Carlos Santana, Peter Gabriel, Alicia Keys, Josh Groban, Branford Marsalis, Joss Stone, and many more. Known for her dynamic and uplifting music, she has translated her distinctive work in the arts to that of philanthropy; by promoting education for girls in Africa through her foundation, Batonga and as a UNICEF Goodwill ambassador Kidjo travels the world to inspire and empower. DANCE SPACE AVAILABLE! Sponsored by Lighthouse Bank Co–sponsored by Good Times & KUSP 88.9FM...

Mandolinist Danilo Brito brings tradition and originality to his instrument: Mandolin Messiah

By Elizabeth Pandolfi | 2014 | Charleston City Paper Being corrected by a five-year-old isn’t usually cause for pride. But when that five-year-old is your son, and he’s correcting your musical technique on the instrument you both play, well, that’s a bit different. Danilo Brito, a mandolin virtuoso from Brazil, was that five-year-old. “I remember my father would tell his friends proudly that I corrected him on some part of the melody,” Brito says, speaking through his translator and manager Maria Silvia Braga. Brito’s father was an amateur musician who played the mandolin and the cavaquinho, a precursor to the ukelele that originated with the Portuguese. He’s the reason Brito first picked up a mandolin, although that’s about as far as his influence went. “My father’s technique is completely different from my technique. Since I was a child I developed the sound — I tried different ways of holding it until I found what was comfortable and what made the sound better. That’s how I developed — not copying my father or taking lessons,” Brito says. Like most child prodigies, Brito could play by ear from the start. He learned by listening to his family’s collection of LPs of Brazilian music and practicing on his own. By the time he was 12 he had released his first album and was, for all intents and purposes, a professional musician: he regularly played gigs and competitions, even performed on TV. He’s no stranger to Spoleto either, having performed at the 2010 festival behind the Brazilian clarinetist and saxophonist Nailor Azevedo. Such an early start would seem to lead directly to an...